www.turinghouseschool.org.uk/pupilpremium.php

Turing House

Pupil Premium

‘The Government believes that the Pupil Premium, which is additional to main school funding, is the best way to address the current underlying inequalities between children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and their wealthier peers by ensuring that funding to tackle disadvantage reaches the pupils who need it most.’ (DFE 2012).

Schools are given additional funding for every student on their roll who is:

  • a Looked After Child OR
  • is currently able to claim Free School Meals OR
  • has claimed Free School Meals in the last 6 years.

This additional funding has been allocated to every school due to national figures which show that this group does not achieve as well as their peers. The funding is therefore to support schools to address this issue.

How must this money be used?

Schools are free to spend the Pupil Premium as they see fit. There is no requirement for this money to be spent on individual students simply because they fall into this category. It is expected, however, that the funding will be used to support, as necessary, students in this group and other lower-income families so that this group makes the same progress as their peers

 

The main barriers to educational achievement faced by our disadvantaged students include:

External barriers

Internal Barriers

  • Vulnerable families with emotional and social needs
  • Vulnerable families lacking engagement with education
  • Potential low attendance that impacts negatively on learning
  • Lack of cultural capital and experience impeding ability to contextualise learning, particularly in humanities subjects and English Language and Literature
  • Low KS2 SATs scores on entry to Y7
  • Underachievement due to lack of engagement with education
  • Lack of appropriate space to focus, revise and complete work outside of school environment
  • Speech and language delay
  • Some students with developmental delays
  • Lack of access to funds for necessary equipment/resources
  • Behaviour that impedes learning
  • Potential low attendance that impacts negatively on learning
  • Access arrangements for examinations

No two students have the same needs and while many of our PP students do not face any of these challenges, some face many or all of them.

How much funding does the school receive?

 

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

Students in school

 325  450  575

Proportion of disadvantaged students

 17%  13%  15%

Pupil premium allocation

£60,828.

 £68,872  ~£76500

 

PP Target ImageHow and why does the school use this funding?

The school uses this funding to provide the support structures for those students that need additional help in order to achieve success in line with school and national expectations.

We take this approach because we know there are three fundamental strands to the process of supporting these students to improve their engagement with education:

  • Ensuring their attendance at school
  • Ensuring their engagement with education once in school including supporting their emotional and mental health and developing their interpersonal skills
  • Addressing their particular learning needs to enable them to fully access the curriculum and make progress as good as their peers

IPP Venn Imaget is important to note that it should not be assumed that all students eligible for pupil premium will need some or all of this support.

It is likely that there will be students who will be making excellent progress already, and who will need minimal if any support as a result.

Each student has individual needs and therefore may be supported by initiatives targeting any combination of the three broad areas: attendance, engagement and learning. 

 
How does the school measure success?

The school tracks the progress of all students, including students in this particular group. Success will be evidence that shows that students in this group are making progress in line with all others. We do this using assessment data from all subject areas as well as checks on the development of reading and spelling. We also compare their progress against their peers in the school and nationally, so that we can judge the impact of our work in this broader context.

Disadvantaged student performance overview

 

2018

2019

Progress 8

n/a n/a

Ebacc entry

n/a n/a

Attainment 8

n/a n/a

% Grade 5+ in English and maths

n/a n/a

In 2019, our Year 10 cohort all took GCSE Religious Studies. The outcomes were:

  All students Disadvantaged (PP) (11 Students)
% 9-7  47  9
% 9-5 82   54.5
% 9-4 86   54.5
% 9-1 99   100

Plans and Review

Plans for this year
Strategy aims for disadvantaged pupils

Aim

Target

Target date

Progress 8

Achieve national average for Progress 8 for all pupils

Sept 20

Attainment 8

Achieve national average for attainment for all pupils

Sept 20

% Grade 5+ in English and maths

Achieve average English and maths 5+ scores for similar schools

Sept 20

% Grade 4+ in English and maths

Achieve average English and maths 5+ scores for similar schools

Sept 20

Other

Improve attendance to national average

Sept 20

Ebacc entry

Better national average EBacc Entry for all pupils

Sept 20

Disadvantaged students strategy for the current academic year
Initiatives and actions to improve attendance

Priority / Initiative

Detail / Rationale

Projected spending

Attendance officer time

To improve the attendance at school of disadvantaged students.

 £6,400

Additional Education Welfare Service time

To improve the attendance at school of persistently absent disadvantaged students.

 £4,700

Initiatives and actions to improve engagement including emotional and mental health 

Priority / Initiative

Detail / Rationale

Projected spending

Inclusion staff

To provide safeguarding, mental health and emotional support both directly and in partnership with external agencies to enable students to engage effectively in school

£27,500

£15,400

Emotional support worker

NHS initiative to provide qualified mental health staff in school to support individual students

£5,000

Specific additional support 

For individual high needs disadvantaged students requiring alternative provision

£1,500

Senior Staff Designated Roles

Designated person for looked after children, SENCO contribution, safeguarding contribution

£8,000

£8,000

Miscellaneous other expenditure

Welfare contributions to individuals towards the cost of uniform and key school trips

£2,500

 
Initiatives and actions to improve learning outcomes: whole school teaching developments

Priority / Initiative

Detail / Rationale

Projected spending

Closing the gap in maths

Provision of bespoke learning materials to support students with specific difficulties accessing key aspects of numeracy and mathematics (specific reference to concrete, pictorial and abstract resources)

 £8,000

Literacy

Whole school training and development of supporting materials and teaching strategies

 £2,000

Initiatives and actions to improve learning outcomes: targeted support

Priority / Initiative

Detail / Rationale

Projected spending

Literacy screening and recovery programme

To ensure that students unable to access the curriculum because of reading and writing needs are supported to do so 

£1,000 for screening

£6,000 recovery programme

College provision

Construction course for students not served appropriately by GCSE options available for founding year group.

 £10,000


Review of last year
Review: last year’s aims and outcomes

Aim

Target

Outcome

Progress 8

 n/a

 

Attainment 8

n/a 

 

% Grade 5+ in English and maths

n/a 

 

% Grade 4+ in English and maths

n/a 

 

Other

n/a 

 

Ebacc entry

n/a 

 

In 2019, our Year 10 cohort all took GCSE Religious Studies. The outcomes were:

  All students Disadvantaged (PP) (11 Students)
% 9-7  47  9
% 9-5 82   54.5
% 9-4 86   54.5
% 9-1 99   100
Disadvantaged students strategy for the previous academic year
Initiatives and actions to improve attendance

Priority / Initiative

Detail / Rationale

Spend

Attendance officer time

To improve the attendance at school of disadvantaged students.   £6,400

Evaluation

 

Additional Education Welfare Service time

To improve the attendance at school of persistently absent disadvantaged students.

 £4,700

Evaluation

 

Initiatives and actions to improve engagement including emotional and mental health 

Priority / Initiative

Detail / Rationale

Spend

Inclusion staff

To provide safeguarding, mental health and emotional support both directly and in partnership with external agencies to enable students to engage effectively in school

£27,500

£15,400

Evaluation

 

Emotional support worker

NHS initiative to provide qualified mental health staff in school to support individual students

Additional Educational Psychology time to assess needs of and support provision for disadvantaged

Other programmes/subscriptions (DASH, WAIT III, CTOPP, TOMAL SDMT)

£5,000

£2,800

£1,700

Evaluation

 

Specific additional support 

For individual high needs disadvantaged students requiring alternative provision £500

Evaluation

 

Senior Staff Designated Roles

Designated person for looked after children, SENCO contribution, safeguarding contribution

£8,000

£8,000

Evaluation

 

Miscellaneous other expenditure Welfare contributions to individuals towards the cost of uniform and key school trips £850

Evaluation

 

 

Initiatives and actions to improve learning outcomes: whole school teaching developments

Priority / Initiative

Detail / Rationale

Spend

Staff Training: Learning needs

ELSA, Dyslexia  £1,600

Evaluation

 

Staff Training: Emotional needs

 Whole staff training on attachment disorder and LGBTQ+ inclusion  £1,000

Evaluation

Significant impact; EISS lead states that Turing House School has an impressive approach to attachment difficulties and is an attachment friendly school.

Students recognise that Turing House is a school that welcomes and celebrates diversity; they are able to confidently be themselves. There are minimal incidences of homophobia.

Initiatives and actions to improve learning outcomes: targeted support

Priority / Initiative

Detail / Rationale

Spend

Literacy screening and recovery programme

 

To ensure that students unable to access the curriculum because of reading and writing needs are supported to do so 

£1,000 for screening

£6,000 recovery programme

Evaluation

Students with lower reading and spelling ages have had regular evidenced based intervention to accelerate their literacy progress

Numeracy

Improved numeracy and maths interventions across the school; increased in-class support and purchase and implementation of NumberShark

 £600

Evaluation

Maths progress has improved in KS4

College provision

Construction course for students not served appropriately by GCSE options available for founding year group.

 £10,000

Evaluation

Students taking part in this course have experienced success and are on track to pass their qualification. They were able to sell good quality items they had made at a school fair, showing obvious pride in their woodwork and the positive response they received to their work.

 

Next Review

We will next review the effectiveness of our spending of pupil premium in Autumn 2019.

 
 
 

Login