www.turinghouseschool.org.uk/literacy.php

Turing House

Literacy Across the Curriculum

At Turing House School, we aim to help students who will be successful in their future, whatever path they take. In order to do this, students must be able to express themselves in writing and through speech; they must be able to listen to others’ viewpoints and communicate effectively. All teachers are involved in raising students’ literacy, and our students have plenty of opportunities to develop their reading, writing and speaking skills across the curriculum.

Top Tips to Improve your Literacy

  1. Realise that you’re practising literacy all the time: reading bus timetables, road signs, text messages, cereal boxes; all of these wouldn’t be possible without literacy.
  2. Read widely. Research has repeatedly shown that reading a range of texts regularly can help with vocabulary acquisition, spelling, and learning inherent rules of grammar.
  3. Find and read books that you’re interested in and enjoy. Research by the National Literacy Trust shows that children who enjoy reading are more likely to have good mental health than those who don’t. If you are reading a book you don’t like, instead of putting it off, stop reading it, and swap it for one you do enjoy!
  4. Before writing, talk about what you’re going to write. The act of planning it, especially out loud, helps you articulate your ideas ready for writing.
  5. Keep a journal. Journaling helps you organise your ideas and thoughts, and reflect upon your experiences. The more you write, the more experimental you will become with your writing.
  6. Read through your work carefully, using a checklist of things you know you need to improve on. It might be the basics such as capital letters and full stops, or it might be more complex elements like structuring your sentences for effect.
  7. Practise your spellings. Sometimes, the spelling rules in English just don’t make sense or are really tricky to learn. Use your knowledge of phonics to sound out the word, or use look, cover, write, check to learn the spellings.
  8. Keep a log of new words that you learn, and try to use them in your own talk or writing. You will find that as soon as you learn a new word, you’ll start seeing it everywhere!
  9. Ask a friend to read your writing, and make suggestions for you. Another set of eyes can help you see things you haven’t noticed, and you can share your ideas with them too!
  10. Parents, read with your children. Sadly, this lovely habit seems to stop at secondary school, but it’s so beneficial to your child’s development, and a great opportunity to spend time with your child too!

Book of the Month

 

 

 

 

Literacy Instagram 

 

Reading Lists

These lists are not exhaustive, please email us if you have any additional books that we should add to your lists.

Turing Reading list 

BBC’s 100 books to read before you die 

19th Century Reading List (attached)

Carnegie Medal Winning books

Its important to stretch yourself when it comes to your reading. If in doubt, use this handy calculator to see if you are being challenged enough.

 Useful Links 

Local Libraries 

Local Charity Bookshop 

National Literacy Trust 

British Library 

Richmond Recommendations 

 

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